Quinola

Quinola’s philosophy is deeply ethical. They believe that business is a good thing, but that business is also often horribly unfair to the growers themselves. They were sick of seeing the farmer bullied into a corner, and set about to balance the scales a bit.

Quinola’s quinoa is sourced directly from a group of 500 famers in Peru called Cabana Co-operative, based just north of Lake Titicaca. Quinola want to do things just a little bit differently, and make sure that all quinoa is bought under fair trade rules. No chemical nasties are used during the growing process, and the farmers use a mixed agriculture and crop rotation method which is better for local wildlife and allows the land to regenerate between harvests.

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“With Quinola it is all pretty straight forward. You can be confident that by helping yourself via a healthier diet and an enjoyable meal you will be also helping lots of other people along the way.”

James Livingstone Wallace – Founder of Quinola

Quinola are a shining example of how people and the planet can work together. Quinola's fair trade quinoa is grown by traditional farmers at the Cabana Co-operative in Peru, where there are around 500 farmers whose lives revolve around the sun rising, the rain falling, and the earth delivering their 'mothergrain' – quinoa. Quinoa is seen as the sacred crop of the Incas, a versatile, nutritious super-grain that's even been recognised as a superfood by NASA, who use it as a key food source for missions into deep space! It's a complete vegetation protein, is gluten free, cholesterol free, and contains slow release carbs to keep you full for longer. If you haven't yet tried it, you're in for a treat.

Very much in touch with their traditional roots, Quinola uses no chemical nasties or fossil fuel fertilisers during the production of the quinoa. All of the quinoa growers practice mixed agriculture, traditional ploughing, and crop rotation, which allows the land to heal and regenerate between fallow periods. This also means that the growers aren't reliant on one crop, and can use animal mature as a natural fertiliser. Until 100 years ago all agriculture was organic, but to the growers at Cabana it's still second nature to be respectful of the environment and the earth goddess. Offerings are regularly made to Pachamama to ensure healthy harvests, and if the rains are late, the elders go on a fourteen hour trek to the foot of an ancient volcano, where they offer up prayers into the night, before heading back to Cabana for celebrations in honour of the earth.

Quinola's quinoa is completely fair trade, and the Cabana co-operative support the growers beyond buying their crops above market prices. They make sure that the harvests are sold in a way that puts as little pressure on the farms as possible, and also make sure that the traditional techniques used to grow the quinoa are constantly being improved. Shared lands are equally distributed to all families, so that they can live off the land confidently, and with all the support they might need.