Wendy from Moral Fibres


We sat down with Wendy from Moral Fibres, to chat about green living, Fairtrade Fortnight, and how easy it is to make one simple step towards a more sustainable lifestyle.


Hi Wendy! So  could you tell us a little bit about Moral Fibres?

Hello! Of course! I started writing Moral Fibres in February 2013 when I couldn’t find an eco blog at the time that was about stylish sustainable living. I set out to find a blog to read and be inspired by, and when I realised there wasn’t one I ended up writing Moral Fibres!
Moral Fibres is all about sustainable living that’s hip, not hippie.

I cover all sorts of topics, from stylish ethical fashion, to green cleaning, vegetarian and vegan eating, and everything in between. I’m also open to reader requests, so if anyone wants a post on a particular subject I’ll always do my best to accommodate that.

Was there a particular point in your life that made you think about living a greener life?

I can’t think of a time when I wasn’t interested in the environment and in green living. As a kid I was always poking about in stream and rock pools, and my pockets were always full of conkers, shells, stones and leaves.

I kept that interest up, and I ended up studying for an undergraduate degree in Environmental Geography, which I followed that up with a MSc in Environmental Sustainability, so it’s safe to say it’s been a lifelong interest!

How do you see attitudes to sustainability change as we move into the future?

Sustainability is changing. In the 1990s and 2000s you were considered green if you recycled your newspapers, and if you did anything more than that then you were considered an ‘eco warrior’.

Now there is so much awareness about for example plastics and microplastics that more and more consumers are demanding plastic free products, consumers that perhaps wouldn’t even have identified themselves as an “eco warrior”. Sustainability is definitely becoming more and more mainstream, which is amazing.

What are you ambitions for Moral Fibres in the future?

I have just released a book – Fresh Clean Home – where I want to encourage people to try out green cleaning, and making their own cleaning products.

Apart from that I have no great ambitions. I just really like writing, so my ambitions are simply to keep writing and to keep sharing useful green articles with my lovely band of readers.

Does fair trade fit much into your eco-ethos?

Definitely. A product can hardly be planet friendly when those who are involved in its production are treated badly. I’ve noticed through Moral Fibres that people are getting savvier and looking more and more for eco-friendly AND fair trade goods.

Our Fairtrade Fortnight celebrations focus on inspiring others to swap one regular product they buy for a fair trade option – and this is their ‘Fair Trade First’ for 2018. If you were going to make something your own ‘Fair Trade First’ this year, what might it be?

For a “Fair Trade First” I would suggest always suggest swapping your regular bar of chocolate for a fair trade chocolate bar.

It’s an easy swap, and you get rewarded with a tasty and fair treat! It’s a great win-win! It’s so important to look for chocolate that’s delicious, fair trade, organic, recyclable, and lined with compostable ‘foil’ made from plant material if possible. It makes the chocolate zero-waste!

Any tips for our followers on how to live better every day?

It can be really overwhelming knowing where to start to live greener, so I’d always suggest starting small. Make one positive change, no matter what it is, and go from there, one small step at a time. Remember that no-one is perfect, so don’t be afraid to make mistakes!


Thank you Wendy! You can read more about Wendy over at Moral Fibres, or if you feel ready to make one small positive change, explore our fair trade food and drink collections to choose your own fair trade first.


Or if you’re feeling inspired to hunt down some astonishingly fair, organic, sustainable, eco-friendly and utterly delicious chocolate that’s wrapped in shiny gold plant-based compostable foil, look no further than Eat Your Hat.